Friday, September 5, 2014

Reader Friday: A Tip of the Hat


Time to tip your hat. Who is someone who has helped you along your writing journey? What did they give you that you appreciate?

23 comments:

  1. I took continuing education courses at UCLA, which helped me figure out how to create a workable story idea out of the creative notions that were rumbling around in my head.

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    1. Did you specifically take creative writing courses? I've taken lots of classes at UCR, but none of them ever helped my writing. I actually felt that they took away from my skills. The teachers didn't know how to actually teach craft.

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    2. The first class I took was actually a screenwriting class, R.A.. But the class that really helped me was called something like "Introduction to Writing the Novel I". A group of attendees from that class formed a writing group, which has evolved over time, and continues to this day.

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  2. The first writing conference I attended, I was lost, confused, and discouraged after the first day. I wanted to leave. My wife, also attending, suggested I go with her the next day, saying she'd really enjoyed the class. I did, and James Scott Bell made fiction real to me. After that, I decided maybe I could do it, too. Thanks, Jim.

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    1. Thanks, Doc. You have since more than proved your bona fides, and been a great example for other writers.

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  3. Oh dear...so many.
    Jerry Healy was kind to me when I was dazed and confused, giving me friendship, blurbs, and sage advice on navigating the "high school" shoals that sometimes pop up in the crime community.

    Jan Burke's advice stays with me to this day: Keep your head down and write.

    And my sister Kelly who talks me off the ledge nearly every day. I would be lost without her.

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  4. My friend, author Jack Cavanaugh, graciously gave me all sorts of advice on the publishing biz when I was just starting out. One bit of advice was that I should use my background to write legal thrillers (I was trying to be Kurt Vonnegut at the time). Well, duh. That led to a five-book contract....and a career.

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  5. I've received more support than there is room to acknowledge in my short writing journey but will list the some of the most important.

    The Loft Literary Center in MPLS provided me the opportunity to participate in more than 30 writing courses and conferences taught by published authors Ellen Hart, Vince Flynn, Wm Kent Krueger, Michael Stanley, Mary Carroll Moore, David Housewright and other incredible author/educators. This education provided the foundation for my ongoing writing efforts.

    Jodie Renner was the single most important individual in helping me get my book in print. Rock-solid professional editing and much more. I did not pursue the traditional publishing route based on what I learned via TKZ and elsewhere about what the different pathways offered. Jodie was unbelievably generous in guiding me through the self-publishing process and continues to provide me instruction on the challenges of self-marketing. A "tip of the hat" is not sufficient acknowledgment of this incredibly gifted and generous woman's support.

    Additionally TKZ and particularly JSB (had opportunity to participate in "Masters" seminar with JSB and his colleagues) have been ongoing sources of meaningful education.

    I'm several years into my writer's journey and any "accomplishment" is hard to measure. What is undeniable is that a great many have graciously assisted me without expectation of recompense.
    It is an honor to be a part of a fraternity that includes so many kind and generous souls.
    I'll do my best to carry on the tradition.

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    1. Wow. I just read this now. Thank you so much for your kind words, Tom. It was a real pleasure to work on your excellent medical thriller, and it's an honor to know you!

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  6. I'm with PJ, boy are there a lot! I'd say this time around I will thank my friend Suz (@SuzJay11) for being so kind and helping me navigate my first conference two years ago. Since then, she's helped me in so many other ways, aside from just being a great friend and a wonderful writer!

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  7. To be honest, aside from my wife herself and the people running around in my head, you guys here at TKZ have inspired and bolstered my continuing journey. Every time someone laughs or comments on the little stories that spontaneously erupt from my keyboard in these comments I feel like I've jumped a little hurdle and created a living thing. Some of those end up as scenes in my novels and others (Leonard's Time Machine and the Leprechaun Brothers in particular) are gradually being compiled into complete story arcs of their own.

    To have this forum as both a learning center and a sounding board has been a big inspiration.

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    1. By the way, not all boards react the same way to my quippy little stories. Some simply ignore, and once I was even asked to leave ... you guys have tolerated me well for these past 6 years.

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    2. You're part of the family, Basil! We couldn't do without 'ya!

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    3. We appreciate you Basil, unlike those heathens.

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  8. Many people, but my wife Lisa first and foremost. She has supported and encouraged me every step of the way and continues to do so.

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  9. Carolyn Matthews was my writing instructor for my first Long Ridge Writers Group course. She took me from a wet-behind-the-ears, head hopping, story arc clueless newbie and set my feet on a solid foundation. Thanks, Carolyn.

    Carole Bellacera, my instructor for the novel course with Long Ridge Writers Group, guided me in the right direction, encouraged me, educated me with editing, and cheered me on. Thanks, Carole.

    For all the writing craft books, JSB's sit on the top of my working stack. Thanks, Jim.

    I sold my first novel a month ago, and made it into an anthology at about the same time. Joe Hartlaub's generous comments and advice on two simultaneous contracts were priceless. Thanks, Joe.

    And to all of you TKZ contributors, you are a constant source of education. Thanks!

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  11. That's a tough question. The writing community is so generous, it's hard to pick one person. But my husband, Don Crinklaw, is my first reader and my first critic, and he knows how to encourage me and tell me when my writing is going wrong without crushing me. That's an art and a gift.

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    1. I wish my husband was such a good critic, LOL. He loves my writing and supports me fully, but the most he can give me for crits is "good job." XD You're very blessed to have a husband willing to critique you. =)

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  12. I have to tip my hat to one of my best friends, K. M. Carroll. She was the first person who read my story and had the guts to tell me it sucked and I should start over. XD She's really helped me grow as a writer by giving me awesome articles, crits, and generally mentoring me through my writing journey. If it hadn't been for her, I don't know where I'd be in my writing journey.

    Thanks for everything, Kessie. =)

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  13. The list is legion, but a couple:

    1. TKZer John Gilstrap ( I am came while I was stalking, um, researching his work before a writers con) for the unvarnished critique that was backed up with education and encouragement.

    2. Agent Janet Reid who has become a friend. The novel that I now have on pre-order came out of a conversation with her at a writers con in Houston.

    3. All the mods here at the TKZ who won't throw me off for sneaking in this Devil's Deal pre-order link.

    And, finally, those here at TKZ for the critiques, encouragement, and maintaining one of the best places on the net to hang out.

    Terri

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  14. I've been fortunate to have encountered a great number of generous people in the writing community, but I must tip my hat to my former writing/ critique group. When I first got serious about writing fiction, they introduced my to a world of craft books I didn't know existed. One member in particular, the late Dee Stewart, who wrote as Miranda Parker, explained story arcs and plotting in a way I could grasp.

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  15. Sorry for my late arrival here. Two writers who influenced me a great deal when I was just getting started formulating my ideas on how to write compelling fiction are James Scott Bell (x 5) and Jessica Page Morrell. Thanks, JSB and JPM! :-)

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