Friday, April 11, 2014

Reader Friday: Your Favorite Thriller Sub-genre?


What is your favorite thriller sub-genre? Legal thriller? Female in jeopardy?  Psychological or techno thriller? What would be the best example of your favorite sub-genre?

19 comments:

  1. Wow, I'm first? I love Legal Thrillers. James Scott Bell's Ty Buchanan series. I also like author Randy Singer, but a title doesn't come to mind right now. Next I really like John Gilstrap's Jonathan Graves books. Not sure what sub-genre that would be. Political thriller?

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  2. Political thriller I think, Peggy, which is also one of my favorites. I'm also keen on techno or sci-fi thrillers, with Michael Crichton being my favorite author. I'm currently reading MICRO, but nothing will ever beat JURASSIC PARK I think? Thanks for visiting!

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  3. I love political thrillers as well. The late Vince Flynn was a favorite.

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  4. I enjoy reading Olen Steinhauer, Robert Littell, Alan Furst, T. Jefferson Parker and Gabriel Cohen. What's all that say?

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    1. That you like spy tales, police procedurals, and the occasional offbeat yarn! :)

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  5. Crime Thrillers? Police procedural thrillers? Typically with a protag who's a professional sleuth. Not sure which label works best but my favorite author/protagonist teams are Crais/Elvis Cole & Joe Pike, Connelly/Bosch, Garritsen/Rizzoli & Ilses, Deaver/Kathryn Dance, Zoe Sharp/Charlie Fox, Patterson/Women's Murder Club, Parker/Charlie Hood

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  6. Easy for me--science thrillers! The term is not yet widely used but I'm working on it...

    Science thrillers are not "science fiction," which conjures up images of dystopian futures, aliens, and time travel. They're also not technothrillers, which to most people suggests a strong military/machine aspect to the story.

    Science thrillers ("SciThri") are thrillers or mysteries that have real science, technology, mathematics, or medicine as an important part of the plot. It also includes thrillers & mysteries that feature a protagonist who is a professional in any of these fields.

    Michael Crichton's JURASSIC PARK is the epitome of the SciThri subgenre.

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  7. I like a well crafted rnon-violent thriller where brains over brawn dominates. Guess that's why I am still a strong Agatha Christie and Sherlock Holmes fan. Half the fun of mystery thrillers is trying to figure out who the culprit is and then being surprised at the end.

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  8. I like them all, provided they're well written and have a strong narrative drive.

    I like mysteries, too, but thrillers must, in my opinion, have a really strong narrative drive.

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  9. Crime thrillers, particularly those set in the South.
    LAST CALL FOR THE LIVING by Peter Farris is one that I can't get out of my mind; another example is Ace Atkins' Quinn Colson series. And, of course, every word that James Lee Burke ever wrote.

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  10. In terms of reading, I'm omnivorous (actually, this applies to eating as well). But with a few exceptions, I especially like books written by writers with a comic sensibility. Again with some notable exceptions, I mistrust humorless writers. Just now, I'm reading Martha Grimes' latest novel, The Way of all Fish. I'm new to Grimes' writing, and I haven't encountered a crime writer before who deserved to be grouped with Elmore Leonard in terms of ear and comic gifts. In my view, Grimes does. The two hit men in this novel are, simply, a stitch.

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  11. Military / Spy / Espionage / Action / Common Man Saves the Day by Breaking the Bad Guys in Two or More No Longer Functional Parts Stories and of course Snugglebunny Mysteries.

    ...okay...maybe not that last one.

    I love Gilstrap's novels. Stephen Pressfield's & Bernard Cornwall's historical thrillers rock. Ken Follet is pretty awesome, both old and new.

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  12. Legal thrillers and medical thrillers, especially medical thrillers where with evil insurance companies and heartless doctors. But those aren't fiction, are they?

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  13. John Gilstrap's Jonathan Graves series is great. Elmo Leonard of course. And what Basil said. Many years ago I read all of Alistair MacLean. South by Java Head was my favorite.

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  14. Historical Mysteries - Dorothy Sayers, Margery Allingham, C.J. Sansom is definitely worth reading - then I go on series binges - Michael Connely, David Baldacci, oh, and Justin Adler Olsen Dept Q novels and then there's Stieg Larsson -
    OK if I had to choose ONE - Dorothy Sayers "Busman's Honeymoon".

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  15. I like the Psycho-thrillers because sometimes the depths of human depravity and craziness amaze me. But someone like Baldacci for political thrillers is pretty much a can't miss for me too.

    Dennis Lehane--not sure if they're psycho-thrillers or dark mysteries. And I don't care. That guy can flat out write!

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  16. Military/espionage. I'm especially enjoying the Bob Lee Swagger series by Stephen Hunter.

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