Friday, July 20, 2012

Reader Friday: Questions for TKZ?

Hey guys, it's Reader Friday, and we want to know what's on your mind. Do you have any burning writing questions you'd like to ask the TKZ'ers? Post 'em in the comments. We'll be monitoring the blog today, and will update it with answers. (Of course, you can ask non-writing questions too, but your results may vary!)


Meanwhile, let's play a game we haven't played in a while. Grab the closest book to you right now. Not the best selling book, or the most impressive, but the closest one. Now turn to page 67. What is the third sentence on that page? Post it in the Comments, and we'll try to guess what book it's from. Or if we can't, we can make up a title! Whoever posts should come back later in the day and reveal what the title is.


Here's one to start:


"I will never forget that moment."

45 comments:

  1. Good morning everybody! Okay, here it is: "like the Second, it recruited foreign agents; like the Seventh, it prepared policy reports based on gathered intelligence; like the Foreign Affairs Bureau, it developed relationships with certain foreign intelligence agencies."

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  2. "He could see the man wished him no ill."

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  3. Sounds like a Tom Clancy thriller, something like RED STORM RISING. I'll work on it!

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  4. From the book on a shelf just above my computer:

    etc.; "chapter1:1," "chapter 1:2," etc.) Arabic numerals may be used for

    Not my favorite, but a necessity. Surely this matches the same book on someone else's desk.

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  5. Kathleen, yours is tough. Sounds a little like Dickens. It's off-season for A CHRISTMAS CAROL, though! :)

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  6. Ah, you're referring to ye olde User Guide, perhaps, Richard? I used to write those in a former life, sigh.

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  7. Bewildered, Langdon looked at the image.

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  8. After my intruder had run away, I'd waited for the security guard to pass by my cottage, but he never materialized.


    One of my favorite authors!

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  9. I had two that were exactly equidistant ... and yes, I measured them.

    “Well, your experience with the SAS should certainly reduce the language barrier for us all."

    and

    Utilisez la sortie arrière (droit) pour cartonnés, transparents, enveloppes et étiquettes.

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  10. "She was starting to regret what she had done--she thought she had scared the animal back into hiding--when the little round head reappeared."

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  11. And my burning question for the group -- What have you always wanted to try in your writing career, but so far were unable to, and why?

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  12. "In this age, lies were the universal lubricant of the culture."

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    Replies
    1. Breathless by Dean Koontz. One of my fav authors

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  13. Question...

    Writing - well that's just fine and you can keep plugging along. BUT - what are some of your best tricks for REVISION? When you are trying to plug along and just get stuck and can't quite figure out why - how do you keep on keeping on with the revision?

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  14. David--I've been curious about adapting a book for the big screen. Every since I heard that one author always started his books by writing a screenplay and filling it out from there, I've been curious about how screenplay writers take a work of fiction and turn it into a movie script.

    Jim knows more about this process than I do, but I would imagine it's a challenge from book to book. HUNGER GAMES for example appears to stock pretty close to the book, whereas other novels are based only loosely on character or premise.

    As for why I haven't done this, I've been too busy writing my contracted material, but I think it's important for authors to understand plotting structure and what makes a good movie. The principles would enhance any book.

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  15. Chaco--I know Jim and others are big believers in revising in drafts, but I find it easier to revise as I go. I edit my daily word count in a rolling fashion, never delaying my forward progress, but always looking to tweak the last chapter or so.

    But when I get stuck for ANY reason, I find anyone to talk out my issues with. I find that they don't have to be a writer. They only have to be a good listener. Often, you are closest to the story and will find the solution on your own. The process of talking frees up the log jam in your brain as you speak. Start by explaining the book, then the specific problem. Your voice and your thought process will trigger solutions. If the person is good, they might help, but talking it out is a good way to back out of a corner.

    It's really weird how this works. You'd think that since YOU are the writer, you'd have your own solutions, but talking helps "discover" new things you hadn't thought of because you're too close to it. Good luck.

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  16. I'm in the midst of new bookshelves and re-organization, so this is not what would normally be my nearest book.

    "Gone away upstream, bas-relief Dumpster lost in the gray light as now Slothrop is going past the sign of Will Stonybloke, of J.Peter Pitt, of Jack Kennedy, the ambassafor's son - say where the heck is that Jack tonight, anyway?"

    Richard Mabry's is the Chicago Manual of Style. That line appears on p 67 of my copy of the 16th edition.

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  17. David DeLee's is from OPEN SEASON by C.J. Box.

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  18. Closest book to me right now:

    "Readers worry about a Lead who might be crushed at any time."

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  19. as it's the book i'm reading, it's in my lap. 'She understood that others going through this ceremony had succcumbed to nerves, and it was even rumored that one young woman had become so upset that she had removed her shoe and promptly vomited into it.'
    question....i was curious why the typeset is mentioned at the end of novels. i've never stopped reading one due to the typeset!! and they all look the same to me!! kathy d.

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  20. Jordan--very interesting. If you don't know her Alexandra Sokoloff, a screenwriter and novelist, talks a lot about the cross over of writing for screen and prose at her website and has a book related to it. Good luck with it.

    Joe -- you got me. :)

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  21. Matthew, that sounds VERY familiar!

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  22. Jordan, my early training was as a screenwriter. That was incredibly valuable when I started writing fiction, as I could think visually, get in and out of scenes, write crisp dialogue. I find novelists have a tougher time trying to write a screenplay.

    When I was hired to adapt a book into a script a couple of years ago, I found the process to be a bit of a challenge. You have to know the material deeply so you can choose essential scenes, and know what has to be in and what should be out. The book I was adapting was huge, and had multiple subplots. It was a test, but ultimately fun.

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  23. Okay here's the first novel I put my hands on:
    (part of the sentence, the full sentence is long and would give too much away)
    "He declared Egyptians walked that way; I said if they did I didn't see how they got anything done..."

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  24. Oooh! BK, I know that one... "The Bangles Autobiography"

    Right? Right?

    Or was it a Steve Martin book?

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  25. James Scott Bell: I thought it might.

    But it is honestly the book I have closest to me at the moment.

    Thank you for writing "Plot & Structure." I'd got myself in a right muddle with my plotting, but after seeing Clare Langley-Hawthorne's post about the LOCK method, (which just made so much sense) I ordered your book and it has really helped. So thanks both of you.

    All the Best,

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  26. The first one (on the blog page) is from STEVE JOBS by Walter Isaacson...

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  27. "Bewildered, Langdon looked at the image." Hint: it's from an obscure novel by a little know writer named Brown.

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  28. David-- I know Alexandra & love her. She was a guest here not too long ago. I follow her blog.

    Jim--I know you have great experience with screen plays. Thanks for your comment. I can imagine adapting a novel to screen would be a real challenge to do it justice & create something moviegoers will love too. I've had a couple of inquiries on the availability of film rights on a couple of my books & that got me thinking about the adaptation. Fun to imagine.

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  29. Joe--I knew Langdon was from Dan Brown, but which book in the series? If I had to guess, I'd say Da Vinci Code.

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  30. Matthew beat me to it! : P

    Okay gang, this is my "take to a deserted island book."


    Muley took a quart bottle of water out of his hip pocket and set it on the porch.


    Terri

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  31. When Berger fell asleep sometime after 2:00 in the morning, Blomkvist lay awake studying her profile in the dimness.

    (No hints. This is too easy.)

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  32. And it is Ms. Dane for the win!

    Page 67 of 1966 21st edition of The Grapes of Wrath that I shamelessly stole from the library at Columbia Junior College. It was due May 31, 1978, but I loved it so much I told them I lost it. I later paid the $1.57 fee, but I never ever gave the book back.

    Terri

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  33. LOL Basil. But no.

    If anyone needs an additional clue it was a one-book author.

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    Replies
    1. To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee (Ghost writer - Steve Martin)

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  34. Jordan is right again, it is Koontz & it is from Breathless.

    Also, thanks Jordan. I've been doing more cleaning as I go in my newer stuff. The one I'm working on revising is killing me... It was my first nano and I love it, but it is definitely my toughest revision, every time I think it's taming, it nips back at me. It's like working with a recuse puppy... I know it will be the best one in the end, but it sure is a lot of faith and hard work to get there... And a lot of not quitting as well. :D

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  35. Chaco--Then hang in there with this one & continue to have faith that you'll figure it out. Take it a piece at a time & have patience with yourself.

    Rescue pups are definitely worth the extra effort. Your analogy made me smile. I've got my two rescue dogs curled up next to me now. They are definitely worth it.

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  36. Yes, mine was from the current edition of the Chicago Manual of Style, which I've been browbeaten into purchasing and am already finding invaluable.

    This is fun.

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  37. And no cheating by Googling the line, lol!

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  38. What are the odds that pg 67 line 3 is Google-able? Actually goodreads is a great resource too.

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  39. Mine was from An American Spy by Olen Steinhauer.

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